Common Beans

Eating these common beans can certainly help fight of chronic diseases, diabetes and cancer as well as protect your heart and arteries. Concerning diabetes, one study suggests it can help with both hyperglycemia (too much blood sugar) as well as hyperinsulinaemia (too much insulin).
These are the beans that we commonly (and some not so commonly) eat. They all have similar health benefits and the amounts of nutrients do not differ by much in most cases. There are several more varieties of the common bean around the world. Here are a few that you may be familiar with.

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SOMMAI black beans freedigital ID-10070815Black Beans/Black Turtle Bean ★★

These beans are one of the best all around beans you can eat. It’s a solid source of protein and almost all minerals. As great as Black beans are at fighting disease and giving you fiber and protein, black bean sprouts may be even better. Sprouts that were about 3 to 5 days old contains compounds that caused human breast and colon cancer cells to die while leaving the normal cells in the study unharmed. The authors noted that the sprouts contained antioxidants called soyasaponins, genistein, and quercetin. It’s the combination of these antioxidants that caused the bean sprouts to stop hormone dependent cancer cells like breast cancer cancer from growing.

Click here for more info on the nutritional content of Black beans.

1. Guajardo-Flores, D., Serna-Saldívar, S. O., & Gutiérrez-Uribe, J. A. (2013). Evaluation of the antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of extracted saponins and flavonols from germinated black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Food Chemistry.

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Ian L / Wikipedia

Cranberry Bean/Roman Bean ★★

These beans are special because they contain almost 100% of our daily fiber needs in 1 serving.

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Kidney bean Andrew Butko wikimedia 800px-Ab_food_19

Kidney Beans

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great northern beans cookbookman17 flickr 5684475690_0f60168114_z

Navy Beans/White Bean/Great Northern Bean ★★

Navy Beans are one of the best sources of phosphatidylserine.

Phosphatidylserine is a nutrient in the brain that helps nerves and cells communicate with each other. This nutrient is important for your nervous system, brain function and memory. These and white kidney beans are very good sources of phosphatidylserine and very good sources of fiber. In fact, Navy Beans have more fiber than red kidney beans. Navy beans have about 19 grams of fiber per serving while red kidney beans have about 13 grams per serving.

1. http://www.sharecare.com/question/what-is-phosphatidylserine

2. http://www.cookandgarden.com/2012/07/health-benefits-of-navy-beans.html

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marc kjerland flageolet beans flickr 4044122852_ea9f6d5fa3_z

Flageolet Beans

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Pinto_beanPinto Bean

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Lima beans 800px-NCI_lima_beans

Lima Beans

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yellow eyed beans swanksalot flickr 8262224812_e85a8b8f32_z

Yellow-Eyed Beans

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783px-Ordinary Runner Beans

Runner Beans

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Peas/String Beans/Green Beans/Wax Beans

String beans and Green beans are the same thing. They can come in green or yellow varieties. Peas are the little pods from the inside of the bean. String beans are low on the glycemic index mainly because of their high fiber, protein content. It’s a very good for lowering cholesterol and the antioxidants make it a good anti inflammatory food. The fiber in string beans can act like a prebiotic, meaning it can boost the activity of the healthy bacteria in your gut. The seed coat seems to contain a majority of the healthy nutrients.

  1. Dahl W, Foster L, Tyler R. Review of the health benefits of peas (Pisum sativum L.). The British Journal Of Nutrition [serial online]. August 2012;108 Suppl 1:S3-S10.

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References:

1. Hutchins A, Winham D, Thompson S. Phaseolus beans: impact on glycaemic response and chronic disease risk in human subjects. The British Journal Of Nutrition [serial online]. August 2012;108 Suppl 1:S52-S65.

2. Hutchins, A. M., Winham, D. M., & Thompson, S. V. Impact of Pulses Obesity/Satiety, Glycemic Response, Metabolic Syndrome and CVD Risk Factors Phaseolus beans: impact on glycaemic response and chronic disease risk in human subjects.

3. Câmara, C. R., Urrea, C. A., & Schlegel, V. (2013). Pinto Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as a Functional Food: Implications on Human Health. Agriculture, 3(1), 90-111.

 

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