Kale

Kale

Kale ★★

Like Tomatoes, heating up Kale actually brings out more of its healthy antioxidants. Eating it regularly can help lower the risks for cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Kale juice can help you lower your cholesterol levels.2   Kale contains a very high level of antioxidants, perhaps one of the highest levels of all vegetables. It also contains a very powerful antioxidant called Kaempferol, which has been shown to lower the risk of ovarian cancer by up to 40% depending on how much kaempferol rich foods you are eating.3 In this case, eating the kale raw or lightly steamed/heated would be better.  

Kale is also high in vitamins C, E, fiber. It has nearly 700% of the daily recommended intake of Vitamin K, 130% of the daily recommended intake of Vitamin C, and 200% of your Vitamin A. What’s great is you can get all of this from 1 cup of chopped Kale. Click here to see more of the nutritional content.

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Kale also has a pair of very powerful compounds. The first is an antioxidant and carotene called lutein, which is also found in eggs. The second is called Glutamine, a powerful antioxidant.4

 

What makes Kale so special is that its very easy to grow in your backyard or garden almost all year round and because its so rich in healthy compounds it is also a very strong anti inflammatory food.

One way to cook Kale is to put it in a pan chopped up with a little Olive Oil, Garlic and Salt. It is delicious and kids will love it too.

 

 

  1. Kahlon T, Chiu M, Chapman M. Steam cooking significantly improves in vitro bile acid binding of collard greens, kale, mustard greens, broccoli, green bell pepper, and cabbage. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.) [serial online]. June 2008;28(6):351-357.
  2. Kim S, Yoon S, Kwon S, Park K, Lee-Kim Y. Kale juice improves coronary artery disease risk factors in hypercholesterolemic men. Biomedical And Environmental Sciences: BES [serial online]. April 2008;21(2):91-97.
  3. The Dr. Oz Show
  4. Kural B, Küçük N, Yücesan F, Orem A. Effects of kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala DC) leaves extracts on the susceptibility of very low and low density lipoproteins to oxidation. Indian Journal Of Biochemistry & Biophysics [serial online]. October 2011;48(5):361-364.
  5. Kurilich A, Tsau G, Brown A, et al. Carotene, tocopherol, and ascorbate contents in subspecies   of Brassica oleracea. Journal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry [serial online]. April 1999;47(4):1576-1581.
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