Gooseberry

Gooseberry

Gooseberries ★★★

Gooseberries are related to Currants and carry similar health benefits. However, there is one type of Gooseberry that surpasses all others: Indian Gooseberry.

 

Indian Gooseberry ★★★

Also known as Amlaki or Amla in India, it is one of the most important foods in Ayurvedic treatments. It may be one of the most powerful medicines on the planet especially when it’s dried out and used like an herb. It has 20x more vitamin C than Oranges. Vitamin C works both as an antioxidant and stress reducer. It is a good source of Gallic acid and other powerful antioxidants that help purify and improve your overall health, especially your nerves.1 It also has other very powerful antioxidants like quercetin, kaempferol and rutin, which have been shown to help reduce your risk of several different cancers 1. It also has curcumins, the primary antioxidants in Cumin and Turmeric.

As a cancer fighter it can help fight off all types of cancer across the board because of the antioxidants that it contains.3 As a bonus, one study found that Amla can increase Glutathione, which a natural antioxidant found in your body. Glutathione is one of the most effective and powerful antioxidants that we know of today. Amla can also help ease some of the side effects of chemotherapy.4

gooseberry-176450_1280

The antioxidants can potentially act as natural sunscreen on your skin from UVB rays from the sun. (This does not mean you should use this berry in any form as a substitute for sunscreen). The vitamin C helps rebuild your skin and get rid of wrinkles especially when it is caused by sun damage.5

It can help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol levels and raise your HDL (good) cholesterol levels. It can help fight diabetes 5,6,8. It is a powerful antibacterial and antifungal fruit that can kill many food borne pathogens like Staph and E.coli.3

If you are suffering with virtually any disease it is likely that these gooseberries can help you.

 

References
  1. Srinivasan, Marimuthu, Adluri R. Sudheer, and Venugopal P. Menon. “Ferulic acid: therapeutic potential through its antioxidant property.” Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition 40.2 (2007): 92.
  2. Vedaliving, Amalak; Emblica officinalis located at http://www.vedaliving.com/product_info.php?products_id=90.
  3. Muthuraman A, Sood S, Singla S. The antiinflammatory potential of phenolic compounds from Emblica officinalis L. in rat. Inflammopharmacology [serial online]. December 2011;19(6):327-334.
  4. Adil M, Kaiser P, Satti N, Zargar A, Vishwakarma R, Tasduq S. Effect of Emblica officinalis (fruit) against UVB-induced photo-aging in human skin fibroblasts. Journal Of Ethnopharmacology [serial online]. October 28, 2010;132(1):109-114.
  5. Adil M, Kaiser P, Satti N, Zargar A, Vishwakarma R, Tasduq S. Effect of Emblica officinalis (fruit) against UVB-induced photo-aging in human skin fibroblasts. Journal Of Ethnopharmacology [serial online]. October 28, 2010;132(1):109-114.
  6. Akhtar M, Ramzan A, Ali A, Ahmad M. Effect of Amla fruit (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) on blood glucose and lipid profile of normal subjects and type 2 diabetic patients. International Journal Of Food Sciences And Nutrition [serial online]. September 2011;62(6):609-616.
  7. Shivananjappa M, Joshi M. Influence of Emblica officinalis aqueous extract on growth and antioxidant defense system of human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). Pharmaceutical Biology [serial online]. April 2012;50(4):497-505.
  8. Kumar A, Tantry B, Rahiman S, Gupta U. Comparative study of antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of methanolic and aqueous extracts of the fruit of Emblica officinalis against pathogenic bacteria. Journal Of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung I Tsa Chih Ying Wen Pan / Sponsored By All-China Association Of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy Of Traditional Chinese Medicine [serial online]. September 2011;31(3):246-250.

Leave a Reply