Fruits N – P

Nectarine

Nectarines

Not as high on the list as other fruits strawberries, blueberries or apples but still a solid source of vitamin C, polyphenols and anthocyanin antioxidants.

 

 
Noni fruit

Noni Berry ★★

We’re probably more use to seeing this as a juice sold in health food stores instead of as a fruit. Noni fruit is a very good and potent anti-inflammatory fruit because it is full of powerful antioxidants. It is also quite good for the immune system.

Noni is traditionally used as a treatment for diabetes, high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, inflammatory conditions and cancer. It may reduce the risk of stroke and it may also have the same effects on the body as ACE inhibitors do (i.e blood pressure lowering medications) 1,3

It has also been used traditionally to help heal wounds, various infections and skin conditions, diarrhea and chronic fatigue.2

The plant extract may also act as an anti-fungal and Noni fruit may help reduce the risk for developing cancer in smokers. However, more research needs to be done to solidify this claim.2

Be careful not to drink too much Noni fruit juice as there have been reports of hyperkalemia (too much potassium in the blood) and liver damage so those taking ACE inhibitor medications and or angiotensin blocking medication should not drink too much Noni juice. Diabetics should read the labels of juices since some brands may have higher sugar content than is safe to consume.2
 

  1. Dussossoy E, Brat P, Michel A, et al. Characterization, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of Costa Rican noni juice (Morinda citrifolia L.). Journal Of Ethnopharmacology [serial online]. January 7, 2011;133(1):108-115.
  2. Cassileth B. Noni (Morinda citrifolia). Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) [serial online]. October 2010;24(11):1061.
  3. Mandukhail S, Aziz N, Gilani A. Studies on antidyslipidemic effects of Morinda citrifolia (Noni) fruit, leaves and root extracts. Lipids In Health And Disease [serial online]. August 20, 2010;9:88.

 

 

Olives

Olives ★

Both Olives and Olive Oil have a large amount of antioxidants in them making them very good fighters of inflammation, disease and cancer.1

Olives that have not been brined or pickled contain even more of the antioxidants in them. Many of the olives we find in stores today have been brined or pickled unfortunately, which removes a good deal of nutrients from them. However, olives are excellent at protecting the heart and preventing heart disease.1,2

Olives may also help reduce the risk of certain breast cancers. It can help suppress the activity of the HER2 gene, which is a gene responsible for cell growth.2

Kalamata Olives can help protect against colon cancer.2

 

  1. Haubner R, Würtele G, Hull E, Spiegelhalder B, Bartsch H. Olives and olive oil in cancer prevention. European Journal Of Cancer Prevention: The Official Journal Of The European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) [serial online]. August 2004;13(4):319-326.
  2. The Dr. Oz Show

 

 
Oranges

Oranges ★

Oranges like many other fruits contain many antioxidants that fight off inflammation, diseases and cancer. The presence of an antioxidant Apigenin allows oranges to have very strong anti inflammatory, and disease fighting capabilities along with very high levels of vitamin C.3 Another antioxidant present in oranges called hesperidin may help postmenopausal women maintain their bone density.2

Organic oranges seem to also have higher levels of antioxidants and possibly more vitamin C than non-organic oranges.4 One study suggests that fruits or fruit juices that contain vitamin C and or potassium may reduce the risk childhood leukemia if it’s consumed on a regular basis during the first two years of life.5 More research needs to be done here however. When consuming fruit juices, be mindful of the sugar content since fruit juice drinks tend to have additional sugar added to them.

The high vitamin C content makes oranges (and orange juice) great to eat or drink when you’re stressed out. The vitamin C can neutralize stress hormones in the body helping you calm down and relax. This effect can also help lower your blood pressure especially if you eat them daily.

 

  1. Cardile V, Frasca G, Rizza L, Rapisarda P, Bonina F. Antiinflammatory effects of a red orange extract in human keratinocytes treated with interferon-gamma and histamine. Phytotherapy Research: PTR [serial online]. March 2010;24(3):414-418.
  2. Horcajada M, Habauzit V, Trzeciakiewicz A, et al. Hesperidin inhibits ovariectomized-induced osteopenia and shows differential effects on bone mass and strength in young and adult intact rats. Journal Of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md.: 1985) [serial online]. March 2008;104(3):648-654.
  3. Patel D, Shukla S, Gupta S. Apigenin and cancer chemoprevention: progress, potential and promise (review). International Journal Of Oncology [serial online]. January 2007;30(1):233-245.
  4. Tarozzi A, Hrelia S, Angeloni C, et al. Antioxidant effectiveness of organically and non-organically grown red oranges in cell culture systems. European Journal Of Nutrition [serial online]. March 2006;45(3):152-158.
  5. Kwan M, Block G, Selvin S, Month S, Buffler P. Food consumption by children and the risk of childhood acute leukemia. American Journal Of Epidemiology [serial online]. December 1, 2004;160(11):1098-1107.

 
Blood orange

Red Oranges (Blood Orange)

Red oranges seem to have very unique abilities compared to other oranges. These oranges have been used traditionally to help heal sore throats and coughs.1 They have more vitamin C than many other citrus fruits and contain antioxidants that can help protect you against UV damage from the sun.6 (Note: please don’t substitute eating oranges for applying appropriate amounts of sunscreen to your skin. Sunscreen is still the best way to protect against sunburns and UV damage to your skin) The presence of these powerful antioxidants make oranges and blood oranges a great fruit to help protect against the effects of aging on the body.

Here is a simple and effective drink to help combat diarrhea. From doctoroz.com

Anti- Diarrhea drink:

1 cup coconut water

1/4 cup orange juice
A pinch of salt
Mix and serve
 

  1. Cardile V, Frasca G, Rizza L, Rapisarda P, Bonina F. Antiinflammatory effects of a red orange extract in human keratinocytes treated with interferon-gamma and histamine. Phytotherapy Research: PTR [serial online]. March 2010;24(3):414-418.
  2. Horcajada M, Habauzit V, Trzeciakiewicz A, et al. Hesperidin inhibits ovariectomized-induced osteopenia and shows differential effects on bone mass and strength in young and adult intact rats. Journal Of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md.: 1985) [serial online]. March 2008;104(3):648-654.
  3. Patel D, Shukla S, Gupta S. Apigenin and cancer chemoprevention: progress, potential and promise (review). International Journal Of Oncology [serial online]. January 2007;30(1):233-245.
  4. Tarozzi A, Hrelia S, Angeloni C, et al. Antioxidant effectiveness of organically and non-organically grown red oranges in cell culture systems. European Journal Of Nutrition [serial online]. March 2006;45(3):152-158.
  5. Kwan M, Block G, Selvin S, Month S, Buffler P. Food consumption by children and the risk of childhood acute leukemia. American Journal Of Epidemiology [serial online]. December 1, 2004;160(11):1098-1107.
  6. The Dr. Oz Show
  7. The Dr.Oz Show

 

 

Passion fruit

Passionfruit

Passionfruit may be beneficial as an alternative treatment for asthmatics to help reduce clinical symptoms.1

Traditionally in Brazil, dried Passionfruit has been used to treat diabetes.2 It’s also been used as a sedative to calm jittery nerves. There are two drinks made from two different species of Passionfruit. One is known as juice maracujd, and the other as maracuja doce (sweet maracuja). These drinks are also used as medicine to treat anxiety and nervousness in Brazil.3

 

  1. Watson R, Zibadi S, Rafatpanah H, et al. Oral administration of the purple passion fruit peel extract reduces wheeze and cough and improves shortness of breath in adults with asthma. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.) [serial online]. March 2008;28(3):166-171.
  2. Silva D, Freitas A, Viana G, et al. Pectin from Passiflora edulis shows anti-inflammatory action as well as hypoglycemic and hypotriglyceridemic properties in diabetic rats. Journal Of Medicinal Food [serial online].
  3. Barbosa P, Valvassori S, Reginatto F, et al. The aqueous extracts of Passiflora alata and Passiflora edulis reduce anxiety-related behaviors without affecting memory process in rats. Journal Of Medicinal Food [serial online]. June 2008;11(2):282-288.

 

 
Papaya

Papaya ★★

Papaya has compounds that can lower blood pressure.1 The main chemical in Papaya is papain, which gives it that rotten smell. Un-ripe papayas contain more papain than ripe ones.

Papaya is very helpful with digestion and may help treat all types of arthritis. It may also help relieve hot flashes.2,3

The fruit also contains lycopene, which is a very powerful antioxidant and cancer fighter that’s also in Tomatoes and Watermelons. Studies show that eating 1 or more papayas a week may reduce your risk of cervical cancer. Try ½ cup daily or about 1 Papaya per week.

Papayas are a great source of carotenes and fiber (Beta-carotene is a type of carotene that is converted by your body into vitamin A). The carotenes can help keep your vision healthy and prevent macular degeneration in your eyes. Carrots are another popular source of carotenes.

Papayas are high in vitamin C, which is an antioxidant that is essential for your overall health and also for collagen growth, which can help reduce the appearance of cellulite and wrinkles on your body.4
 

  1. Nizar M, Suhaila M, Head R. Polyphenol-enriched extract of oil palm fronds (Elaeis guineensis) promotes vascular relaxation via endothelium-dependent mechanisms. Asia Pacific Journal Of Clinical Nutrition [serial online]. 2002;11 Suppl 7:S467-S472.
  2. The Dr. Oz Show
  3. Motherherbs.com. Papaya. Located at http://www.motherherbs.com/carica-papaya.html
  4. The Dr. Oz Show

 

 
Peach

Peaches

Organic peaches may have more vitamin C and citric acid than regular peaches.1

Peaches are a good anti inflammatory fruit and this effect in peaches according to one study may help prevent the onset of an allergic reaction. More studies are needed to help solidify this claim. 2

Another study is showing that peaches may reduce the risk for breast cancer in women by up to 40%. Go for fresh, canned or frozen peaches. Make sure that there is no added sugar in the canned peaches or salt in the frozen ones. Try two peaches per week or 1 cup of frozen or canned peaches per week.
 

  1. Carbonaro M, Mattera M, Nicoli S, Bergamo P, Cappelloni M. Modulation of antioxidant compounds in organic vs conventional fruit (peach, Prunus persica L., and pear, Pyrus communis L.). Journal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry. September 11, 2002;50(19):5458-5462.
  2. Shin T, Park S, Kim S, et al. Anti-allergic inflammatory activity of the fruit of Prunus persica: role of calcium and NF-kappaB. Food And Chemical Toxicology: An International Journal Published For The British Industrial Biological Research Association. October 2010;48(10):2797-2802.
  3. Byrne, D. H., et al. “Health benefits of peach, nectarine and plums.” II International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables: FAVHEALTH 2007 841. 2007.
  4. Noratto, Giuliana, et al. “Identifying peach and plum polyphenols with chemopreventive potential against estrogen-independent breast cancer cells.” Journal of agricultural and food chemistry 57.12 (2009): 5219-5226.

 

 

Pears Anushruti RK Flickr

Pears

Pears are a good source of fiber, vitamin C and vitamin K. One medium sized pear has about 10% of your daily value of vitamins C and K as well as 5-6 grams of fiber, which is over 20% of your daily requirement. The vitamin E content in organic pears may be more than the vitamin E content in regular pears.1

Pears also contain boron, which is a mineral that stimulates the production of sex hormones.2

 

  1. Carbonaro M, Mattera M, Nicoli S, Bergamo P, Cappelloni M. Modulation of antioxidant compounds in organic vs conventional fruit (peach, Prunus persica L., and pear, Pyrus communis L.). Journal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry [serial online]. September 11, 2002;50(19):5458-5462.
  2. The Dr. Oz Show

 

 

Pepino

Pepino

The pepino fruit is a good source of calcium, phosphorus and potassium as well as vitamin C and vitamin B’s like riboflavin, thiamin and niacin. It tastes similar to cantaloupes.

Pepino fruit is a close cousin of the tomato. It’s one of the lesser known fruits that is also a strong cancer fighter. One study found it may have the potential to kill prostate cancer cells and perhaps others cancers as well.1,2

The Pepino fruit may also be an effective weapon against diabetes since it has strong anti inflammatory capabilities and plenty of antioxidants.1

The fruit contains a surprisingly high amount of antioxidants with one study noticing that it was especially good at neutralizing iron ions 3, which can damage your cells when there’s too much of it around. These observations were seen in the lab and not in live specimens. However, the results show that pepino has strong antioxidant potential.
 

  1. Hsu C, Guo Y, Wang Z, Yin M. Protective effects of an aqueous extract from pepino (Solanum muricatum Ait.) in diabetic mice. Journal Of The Science Of Food And Agriculture. June 2011;91(8):1517-1522.
  2. Joshi B. Apoptosis induction by a novel anti-prostate cancer compound, BMD188 (a fatty acid-containing hydroxamic acid), requires the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Cancer Res. 1999;59(17):4343.
  3. Sudha, G., et al. “In vitro free radical scavenging activity of raw pepino fruit (Solanum muricatum aiton).” Int J Curr Pharm Res 3.2 (2011): 137-140.
  4. Sudha, Govindan, et al. “Antioxidant activity of ripe and unripe pepino fruit (Solanum muricatum Aiton).” Journal of food science 77.11 (2012): C1131-C1135.

 

 
pepper-93174_640

Peppercorn (Black Pepper)

Peppercorns are the dried fruit of the black pepper vine. Once the fruit is picked and dried, it’s usually ground up and used as Black Pepper.

Overall, studies suggest that Peppercorn (as well as its’ cousins the hot peppers, are strong anti-inflammatories, high in antioxidants and very good anti-cancer foods1.
 

  1. Liu Y, Yadev V, Aggarwal B, Nair M. Inhibitory effects of black pepper (Piper nigrum) extracts and compounds on human tumor cell proliferation, cyclooxygenase enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nuclear transcription factor-kappa-B. Natural Product Communications. August 2010;5(8):1253-1257.

 

 
Persimmon Eliza Adam Flickr

Persimmons

Since Persimmons are high in fiber and polyphenols, they’re great for warding off atherosclerosis, heart disease, high blood pressure, strokes and cancer1. They can help reduce your LDL cholesterol levels and help reduce your risk of developing atherosclerosis by up to 25%2. In addition to warding off atherosclerosis, eating 2 Persimmons per day can help prevent stomach cancer3.
 

  1. Gorinstein S, Zachwieja Z, Folta M, et al. Comparative contents of dietary fiber, total phenolics, and minerals in persimmons and apples. Journal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry. February 2001;49(2):952-957.
  2. Gato N, Kadowaki A, Hashimoto N, Yokoyama S, Matsumoto K. Persimmon fruit tannin-rich fiber reduces cholesterol levels in humans. Annals Of Nutrition & Metabolism. 2013;62(1):1-6.
  3. The Dr. Oz Show

 

 

Pineapples

Pineapples ★★

Pineapples are full of vitamin C, which helps fight of stress, wrinkles and is a powerful antioxidant. Pineapples can also help you fight off fatigue. There are compounds in pineapples that help the brain release norepinephrine, a hormone that can help start the flight or fight response1.
 

Bromelain

Pineapples contain bromelain, which is a protein/enzyme that can help with digestion and it may also be an effective treatment for urinary tract infections. It can also improve the texture of skin and promote the healing of wounds. Because pineapples contain bromelain and a variety of antioxidants they are a very good anti inflammatory food that also supports the immune system and is a very good cancer fighter. Some studies suggest that bromelain may be on par with or better than some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), like Tylenol or Asprin, in patients suffering with rheumatic diseases or ulcerative colitis. In addition, bromelain has been also reported to protect animals from experimentally induced diarrhea and diarrhea-induced death 2-5.

1 cup of Pineapples contains 130% of your daily value of Vitamin C and 76% of your daily value of manganese.
 

  1. The Dr. Oz Show
  2. Borrelli F, Capasso R, Izzo A, et al. Inhibitory effects of bromelain, a cysteine protease derived from pineapple stem (Ananas comosus), on intestinal motility in mice. Neurogastroenterology And Motility: The Official Journal Of The European Gastrointestinal Motility Society [serial online]. August 2011;23(8):745-e331.
  3. Masson M. Bromelain in blunt injuries of the locomotor system. A study of observed applications in general practice. Fortschr Med 1995; 113:303–6.
  4. Wittenborg A, Bock PR, Hanisch J, Saller R, Schneider B. Comparative epidemiological study in patients with rheumatic diseases illustrated in a example of a treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs versus an oral enzyme combination preparation. Arzneimittel-forschung 2000; 50: 728–38.
  5. Kane S, Goldberg MJ. Use of bromelain for mild ulcerative colitis. Ann Int Med 2000; 132: 680.
  6. The Dr. Oz Show

 

 
Plantain

Plantains

 

 

Plums

Plums

Plums are rich in natural antioxidants. Many of those antioxidants are flavanoids.

Plums are a very good source of vitamin C, which can help reduce stress, wrinkles and help the body absorb iron. Plums are also a good source of vitamin A, vitamin B2 and potassium and fiber 2.

A recent study found that regularly eating prunes (dried plums) could decrease blood pressure and LDL (bad) cholesterol. Additionally, both plums and prunes are full of phenols, natural compounds found in plants, which have protective properties. Plums are available from May to October, and prunes are available year round at grocery stores and farmers markets.1
 

  1. Bouayed J, Rammal H, Dicko A, Younos C, Soulimani R. The antioxidant effect of plums and polyphenolic compounds against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in mouse blood granulocytes. Journal Of Medicinal Food [serial online]. August 2009;12(4):861-868.
  2. The Dr. Oz Show

 

 
Pomegranate iStock_000016263817XSmall

Pomegranates ★★★

Like cherries, pomegranates may also help you recover faster after exercising 1.

The peels have strong antimicrobial compounds. One study found it effective at killing off listeria, e-coli and Yersinia enterocolitica 3.

The fleshly part of the fruit has antiviral qualities and works well with Tamiflu and Oseltamivir to kill off the flu (influenza) according to studies 2,16. Pomegranates are great for overall oral health, especially gingivitis 4. The oil of the seed is a good source of Conjugated Linoleic Acid, also known as CLA, which can help with weight loss and perhaps type-2 diabetes 5. Pomegranates are great for heart health and they’re especially good at reducing the amount of plaque in your arteries (atherosclerosis) and your risk for stroke by keeping blood cell platelets from sticking together so much6.

Pomegranate juice is full of the antioxidants ellagic acid and punicalagin, which can heal damage from free radicals and help preserve the collagen in your skin. One study found that the punicalagin antioxidant is responsible for Pomegranate’s ability to fight the flu specifically the H3N2 virus but in combination with Oseltamivir (or other flu prevention medication) it may possibly help ward off the H1N1 swine flu virus 15.

Pomegranates contain more antioxidants than most other red and purple fruits, red wine, and green tea.

Since it is so good for the heart, it may help increase sex drive in men 13. It is a very powerful antioxidant and anti inflammatory fruit that isalso anti hypertensive (helps lower high blood pressure) and is also showing tremendous promise as a powerful cancer fighter 7-13. One study (although small) found that patients with rheumatoid arthritis, who took POMx supplements (Pomegranate extract) had significant improvement in their overall joint pain. The results suggest pomegranates and or Pomegranate extract may help reduce general and more severe arthritic joint pain 14.
 

  1. Trombold J, Barnes J, Critchley L, Coyle E. Ellagitannin consumption improves strength recovery 2-3 d after eccentric exercise. Medicine And Science In Sports And Exercise. March 2010;42(3):493-498.
  2. Haidari M, Ali M, Ward Casscells S, Madjid M. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) purified polyphenol extract inhibits influenza virus and has a synergistic effect with oseltamivir. Phytomedicine: International Journal Of Phytotherapy And Phytopharmacology. December 2009;16(12):1127-1136.
  3. Al-Zoreky N. Antimicrobial activity of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit peels. International Journal Of Food Microbiology. September 15, 2009;134(3):244-248.
  4. DiSilvestro R, DiSilvestro D, DiSilvestro D. Pomegranate extract mouth rinsing effects on saliva measures relevant to gingivitis risk. Phytotherapy Research: PTR [serial online]. August 2009;23(8):1123-1127.
  5. McFarlin B, Strohacker K, Kueht M. Pomegranate seed oil consumption during a period of high-fat feeding reduces weight gain and reduces type 2 diabetes risk in CD-1 mice. The British Journal Of Nutrition. July 2009;102(1):54-59.
  6. Mattiello T, Trifirò E, Jotti G, Pulcinelli F. Effects of pomegranate juice and extract polyphenols on platelet function. Journal Of Medicinal Food. April 2009;12(2):334-339.
  7. Nair V, Dai Z, Khan M, Ciolino H. Pomegranate extract induces cell cycle arrest and alters cellular phenotype of human pancreatic cancer cells. Anticancer Research. September 2011;31(9):2699-2704.
  8. Jurenka JS: Therapeutic applications of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.): a review. Altern Med Rev 13: 128-144, 2008.
  9. Syed DN, Afaq F and Mukhtar H: Pomegranate derived products for cancer prevention. Semin Cancer Biol 17: 377-385, 2007.
  10. Khan GN, Gorin MA, Rosenthal D, Pan Q, Bao LW, Wu ZF, Newman RA, Pawlus AD, Yang P, Lansky EP and Merajver SD: Pomegranate fruit extract impairs invasion and motility in human breast cancer. Integr Cancer Ther 8: 242-253, 2009.
  11. Rettig MB, Heber D, An J, Seeram NP, Rao JY, Liu H, Klatte T, Belldegrun A, Moro A, Henning SM, Mo D, Aronson WJ and Pantuck A: Pomegranate extract inhibits androgen independent prostate cancer growth through a nuclear factor–kappaB- dependent mechanism. Mol Cancer Ther 7: 2662-2671, 2008.
  12. Adhami VM, Khan N and Mukhtar H: Cancer chemoprevention by pomegranate: laboratory and clinical evidence. Nutr Cancer 61: 811-815, 2009.
  13. Heber D, Seeram N, Wyatt H, et al. Safety and antioxidant activity of a pomegranate ellagitannin-enriched polyphenol dietary supplement in overweight individuals with increased waist size. Journal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry. November 28, 2007;55(24):10050-10054.
  14. Balbir-Gurman A, Fuhrman B, Braun-Moscovici Y, Markovits D, Aviram M. Consumption of pomegranate decreases serum oxidative stress and reduces disease activity in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot study. The Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ. August 2011;13(8):474-479.
  15. Haidari M, Ali M, Ward Casscells S, Madjid M. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) purified polyphenol extract inhibits influenza virus and has a synergistic effect with oseltamivir. Phytomedicine: International Journal Of Phytotherapy And Phytopharmacology. December 2009;16(12):1127-1136.

 

 

Prunes

Prunes ★

Plums are a very good source of vitamin C, which can help reduce stress and help the body absorb iron. They are also a good source of vitamin A, vitamin B2, potassium and fiber2.

A recent study found that eating prunes regularly (a very close relative of plums) may decrease blood pressure and LDL (the bad) cholesterol since they contain a good amount of soluble fiber per serving. Additionally, both plums and prunes are full of phenols, natural compounds found in plants, which have protective properties. They are also a good source of potassium, which is good for your nerves and blood pressure. Plums are available from May to October, and prunes are available year round at grocery stores and farmers markets2,3.

Another study done on postmenopausal women showed that prunes significantly increased their bone density. The prunes increased bone density more than other dried fruits like Figs and Raisins. It also increased their bone density more than Strawberries and Dates too. Although the study had only 100 participants, it was done over a 12 month period4.

1 cup of Prunes contains over 100% of your daily value of vitamin K. However, 1 cup of Prunes also contains a very high amount of sugar. When eating prunes, do not eat too many at once. If you have diabetes, pre-diabetes or are at risk of developing diabetes, you should avoid eating prunes.
 

  1. Bouayed J, Rammal H, Dicko A, Younos C, Soulimani R. The antioxidant effect of plums and polyphenolic compounds against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in mouse blood granulocytes. Journal Of Medicinal Food [serial online]. August 2009;12(4):861-868.
  2. The Dr. Oz Show
  3. The Dr. Oz Show
  4. Arjmandi B, Khalil D, Wild R, et al. Dried plums improve indices of bone formation in postmenopausal women. Journal Of Women’s Health & Gender-Based Medicine. January 2002;11(1):61-68.

 

 

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