Carrots

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Carrots

Carrots may help reduce the risk of reduced bone mass, which can lead to osteoporosis. 1

One study shows that carrots may reduce the risk of developing bladder and kidney cancer.2,3

Carrots are best cooked although they are also good when raw. When carrots are cooked, they release more beta-carotene (vitamin A) of which they are an excellent source. Beta-carotene is a very powerful antioxidant and a pre-cursor of Vitamin A. Cook carrots with the peel intact, which will help seal more of the nutrients in.

Carrots are absolutely full of vitamin A. One medium sized carrot has over 200% of your daily value of vitamin A. This helps make carrots a very powerful anti inflammatory food.

 

Purple carrots

Purple Carrots

Purple carrots are high in anthocyanins and beta carotene, which are both powerful antioxidants. They may also help manage your weight and blood sugar, In one study, those with high levels of carotenoids cut their risk of diabetes in half.3

All in all, 1 cup of carrots per day should provide many of its’ health benefits.

 

Carrot Juice

Carrot Juice daily may help increase the amount of antioxidants in your system and reduce your risk of developing cardiovascular disease and the other things associated with it such as high blood pressure, heart attacks, atherosclerosis and strokes.4

 

 

References:
  1. Fujii H, Noda T, Sairenchi T, Muto T. Daily intake of green and yellow vegetables is effective for maintaining bone mass in young women. The Tohoku Journal Of Experimental Medicine [serial online]. 2009;218(2):149-154.
  2. Silberstein J, Parsons J. Evidence-based principles of bladder cancer and diet. Urology [serial online]. February 2010;75(2):340-346.
  3. The Dr. Oz Show
  4. Potter A, Foroudi S, Stamatikos A, Patil B, Deyhim F. Drinking carrot juice increases total antioxidant status and decreases lipid peroxidation in adults. Nutrition Journal [serial online]. September 24, 2011;10:96.

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